Reiki: Be Humble…

Reiki: Be Humble…

1024 768 Dawn Waterhouse

Reiki: Be Humble…

Sunfacing

Be humble… Humbleness is used in so many phrases – humble apologies, humbly accepting a gift, or being a humble servant, but what is it to be truly humble?

In modern society, it is generally considered that humble people are meek, have low confidence and are too easy going. In reality, this is really not so. It takes a lot of strength to be truly humble, and it is a huge gift to have this skill – but humble people do not shout about their skill as that would be proud… so to learn from a true humble, you will need to observe individuals and decide upon who to look to for yourself.

Some of the skills you are looking to observe and learn are:

  • Being able to treat others as equals, be they a cleaner or the Chairman. That does not mean being overly familiar with them, but treating them with the same humble respect.
  • It means being able to accept compliments with the same dignity and consideration as criticism, as both are equally important for personal growth and development, but it also means being able to process those comments without being egotistical – for we all have days where things go right for us (and days where things go not so right).
  • It also means being able to accept a situation, regardless of being good or bad for themselves, for the greater good of the whole. It does not mean sacrificing ones-self for others, just a point of acceptance so that a situation can move forward with positivity.
  • Being able to make decisions (no matter how tough) based on moral values, rather than ego.
  • The ability to give credit where credit is due. A humble will actually praise others and speak positively (and humbly) of others successes. This is partly why they are such good team players and leaders, as this skill helps them to motivate their staff and those around them.

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  • To lead humbly will involve being able to delegate clearly to those working with you, and allowing them the space to do the work and potentially identify different ways to do the piece of work. The humble leader will be able to take the feedback that there are new ways of delivering the work, and also lead team members (rather than squashing them) when they are perhaps heading off on a wrong tangent.
  • The humble person just is. They are striving to act within their morals, or with respect or kindness, or to be a good but fair leader, they are not trying to be humble. As soon as you are trying to be humble, the ego steps in and the essence of your actions is lost.

My eldest daughter gave me a profound statement the other day. She said an ignorant person thinks they know everything, whereas a wise person, no matter how well-read and researched, knows they know nothing in the whole scheme of things. What a beautiful example of being humble: the wisdom of knowing you do not – and never will – know everything.

Humbleness cannot be claimed, it is an action from the very core of your being – the ability to act with your inner truth for the good of all. Next time we will explore being true about your way and your being as a principle of Reiki, until then I will let you ponder the thought of humble actions that go on around you.

 

Dawn Waterhouse
AUTHOR

Dawn Waterhouse

Dawn is a Homeopath, Reiki master and also works with diet and nutrition. Before this, she was an Accountant. Dawn has two lovely natural children ages 10 and 14 who have not received conventional medications. If you would to know more about natural treatments for a wide array of conditions, or attend one of Dawn's popular self-help workshops, please contact Dawn. The legal bit - Disclaimer The contents of this article are intended as an aid for readers to adopt a healthy approach to their health. The article is not intended as a substitute for medical advice and should not be relied upon in this way. Always consult a Medical Doctor, Homeopath or health practitioner. The author cannot take responsibility for illness arising out of failure to seek medical advice.

All articles by: Dawn Waterhouse

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